Week One: Perspectives on Race: “Notes of a Native Son” by James Baldwin and “Everything That Rises Must Converge” by Flannery O’Connor

 

“Notes of a Native Son” by James Baldwin

James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987) was an American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic. His essays, as collected in Notes of a Native Son (1955), explore palpable yet unspoken intricacies of racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, most notably in mid-20th-century America, and their inevitable, if unnameable, tensions.

Read Baldwin’s work here.

Find some excellent supporting educational materials here.

 

“Everything That Rises Must Converge” by Flannery O’Connor

Mary Flannery O’Connor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American writer and essayist. An important voice in American literature, she wrote two novels and thirty-two short stories, as well as a number of reviews and commentaries. She was a Southern writer who often wrote in a Southern Gothic style and relied heavily on regional settings and grotesque characters. Her writing also reflected her Roman Catholic faith and frequently examined questions of morality and ethics. Her posthumously compiled Complete Stories won the 1972 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction and has been the subject of enduring praise.

Everything That Rises Must Converge is a collection of short stories written by Flannery O’Connor during the final decade of her life. The collection’s eponymous story derives its name from the work of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

Find this compelling short story here.

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